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Meaningful Movies : Sustainable Ballard – "Net Loss"

When:
February 28, 2016 @ 5:00 pm – 7:30 pm
2016-02-28T17:00:00-08:00
2016-02-28T19:30:00-08:00
Where:
Ballard First Lutheran Church
2006 NW 65th St
Seattle, WA 98117
USA
Cost:
Free
Contact:
John Christensen

All are invited to this month’s documentary film offering “Net Loss“, presented by Meaningful Movies : Sustainable Ballard.

Date:  Sunday, February 28
Time:  Doors open @ 5:00pm; film begins @ 5:30pm
Place:  Ballard First Lutheran Church; 2006 NW 65th Street, Seattle
Special Guests:
• Representatives from the International Salmon Delegation/Salmon is Life
• Anne Mosness, fisherwoman and founder of the Go Wild Campaign

Cost:  FREE, donations to offset costs gladly accepted
The screening will be followed by small group discussions.

About Net Loss – The Storm Over Salmon Farming

Examines the controversy surrounding salmon farms, and the threat they pose to wild salmon.
52 minutes
Directed by Mark Dworkin and Melissa Young
Produced by Moving Images Video Project

All over the world, fish are at the heart of people’s diet and culture. And in the Pacific Northwest, there is no fish like the legendary salmon. But decades of poor fisheries management and habitat loss have decimated many wild salmon runs. Now there’s a new way to produce fish – raising them in giant underwater cages known as “net pens.” At first, these pens and the salmon farms that use them seem like a good idea, providing more fish for consumption, while taking the pressure off their wild counterparts. But the farms themselves have become a serious new threat to the survival of wild salmon.

Filmed in Chile, Washington, and British Columbia, NET LOSS assesses the risks and benefits of salmon farming through interviews with government and industry spokesmen, who make the case for salmon farming, and the fishermen, native people, and scientists who extol the dangers it poses and the damage it has already done.

“Probes one of the most important and cautionary tales for the future relationship between humanity and the sea.” Carl Safina, President, Blue Ocean Institute